IC Design

Sophie Taeuber-Arp

The marionettes of the Swiss artist Sophie Taeuber-Arp (1889 – 1943) designed in 1918 for the puppet show «King Stag», belong to the most important and unusual works of art of classic Modernism.

This tragicomedy is a fairy tale of the Venetian Carlo Gozzi which premiered in 1762, retold from a Dadaist perspective. The figures, of exceptional expressiveness, unite Dada performance with Concrete and Constructivist art. They are wood-turned sculptures put together solely from geometric shapes: cylinders, cones and spheres.

Sophie Taeuber-Arp taught textile design at the Kunstgewerbe Schule Zürich (Zürich School of Applied Arts) and was a dancer in the sphere of Rudolf von Laban, the founder of modern dance. Her marionettes contain the innovation which initiated Concrete art: she created autonomous compositions by means of basic geometric forms, without any reductive transformation. The 17 original marionettes are in the collection of the Museum für Gestaltung Zürich (Museum of Design Zurich).
Original Dada Marionette Design 1918
Licensed edition in collaboration
with the Museum of Design Zürich
Made in Germany by IC Design AG,
Zürich, Switzerland

STA-KO
King marionette
CHF 540.00
Original Dada Marionette Design 1918
Licensed edition in collaboration with the
Museum of Design Zürich
Made in Germany by IC Design AG,
Zürich, Switzerland

STA-HI
Stag marionette
CHF 280.00
Cabaret Voltaire – the birth place of DADA in 1916.
Original Dada Marionette Design 1918
Licensed edition in collaboration with the
Museum of Design Zürich
Made in Germany by IC Design AG,
Zürich, Switzerland

STA-WA
Guard marionette
CHF 320.00
100 years DADA
The Dada movement in Zürich began in 1916 at Cabaret Voltaire, spreading to Berlin shortly thereafter. The term anti-art, a precursor to Dada, was coined by Marcel Duchamp around 1913 when he created his first readymades. Dada, in addition to being anti-war, had political affinities with the radical left and was also anti-bourgeois. Dada activities included public gatherings, demonstrations, and publication of art/literary journals; passionate coverage of art, politics, and culture were topics often discussed in a variety of media. Man Ray, Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Hans Arp, Tristan Tzara, Francis Picabia, George Grosz, Marcel Duchamp, Kurt Schwitters, Hans Richter, and Max Ernst, were key figures in the movement.
Kleine Dada Soirée, 1922 lithograph by Theo van Doesburg with Kurt Schwitters.